Dr. Christine Elsey

Research Interests

  • Indigenous land rights
  • First Nations people of the Pacific Northwest
  • Phenomenological anthropology
  • The relationship between land and story
  • Metis studies
  • Metis identity and rights

Biography

Dr. Elsey is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social, Cultural and Media Studies and is a faculty member in long standing at the University of the Fraser Valley. She received her PhD in Sociology and Anthropology at Simon Fraser University in 2001, writing an interdisciplinary thesis entitled, The Poetics of Self, Body and World: A Phenomenological Re-interpretation of British Columbia Ethnography of Aboriginal Peoples. For the past 25 years, Dr. Elsey has focused her research on British Columbia First Nations concerns with a special interest in Indigenous land use and occupancy. Dr. Elsey is active in research and publishing on British Columbia Indigenous issues and on the question of Indigenous rights, in Canada, and on decolonization and reconciliation potentials. Her most recent research focuses on Metis and mixed heritage Indigenous peoples with respect to questions of identity, aboriginal rights and politics. She recently served as review editor for the “Native Studies Review” published by the University of Saskatchewan’s Department of Indigenous Studies from 2010-2016. Earlier in her career, before coming to UFV, Dr. Elsey was active in developing course work and teaching in Indigenous Studies at Langara College and also taught at the SFU/Secwepmec program in Kamloops and at several other colleges and universities.

In 2013, she published a book entitled, “The Poetics of Land and Identity Among British Columbia Indigenous Peoples” with Fernwood Press and she currently has several manuscripts in publication in the area of Metis Studies and on the impacts of globalization on world Indigenous peoples. Over the course of her longstanding career, Dr. Elsey has authored numerous peer reviewed papers, reports, book reviews and articles. Dr. Elsey teaches from a place of post colonial and decolonizing optimism and feels that the social sciences have the important responsibility of shedding light on the colonial past and to pursue a new kind of post- colonial project.

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